The Three Jay Brothers in Khaki

I don’t have Jay’s in my family tree but in case anyone is out there searching for them I found an old newspaper clipping in my grandmother Beatrice Jordan’s papers. I am not sure if she kept this clipping or if my grandfather John M. Dever did. Either way, I have wanted to share this clipping for quite some time. The newspaper mentions Mrs. Jay of Cadieux street, the son’s names were George Arthur, John and William. I also haven’t researched the family at all but for me, the hint is the Signalling Company as my grandfather was also a Signaller. Maybe George Arthur Jay is in the photograph I have of my grandfather’s unit, maybe his friend…Jay boys in Khaki

 

John Brown Jordan & His WWI Service

John Brown Jordan was born August 12, 1888, to parents William and Agnes Brown in Kingston, Ontario. It is not surprising he heeded the call to serve in WWI as his father was a career soldier, as well as his older brother Samuel. John was not new to soldering, he already served nine years with the Royal Canadian Artillery and seven years with the Canadian Army Service Corps. John married to Celina Collins in 1905 at St. Matthew’s Church, Quebec City and they had three children, Celina Agnes Becroft (Bee) born in 1906, John William Sidney (Syd) born in 1908 and Mary Patricia arrived in 1913.

John enlisted September 10, 1914, and is described as fresh complected, with dark blue eyes and medium brown hair. He wasn’t the tallest in stature measuring in at 5’4”.

He sailed on the S.S. Alaunia which transported the first Canadian troops to head overseas. John left for France July 19, 1915, joining the 3rd division and was mentioned in dispatches Dec. 28, 1917. John’s daughter Mary Patricia died while he was gone in 1918. John survived the duration of the war and returned to Canada Sept. 6, 1919, sailing on the S.S. Minnekahda.

John continued working for the military, returning to England and working there as a clerk to the Imperial War Graves Association. John and his wife Celina divorced, and John married Rose Emma Matthews Davis, a widow from England. Rose and John’s only child, a son Leslie was born in 1921 in England.

Leslie also became involved in the military, in WWII he was a Flight Seargent with 108 Squadron. Leslie’s plane crashed in Dundalk, Ireland killing seventeen people. Leslie is remembered on a plaque in Brighton (Downs) Crematorium in England.

John Brown returned to Canada after WWII, and he and his wife settled back in Kingston.

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Rose and John Brown Jordan visiting relatives in Montreal. c1950 

John died there in 1951; he is buried at Cataraqui Cemetery.

  • A memory that told to me by John’s nephew, Herbert Jordan was that John was very hard to understand as he had been gassed during the war and had a hole in his throat.

OGS – Genealogy Without Borders

I have happily arrived at the OGS 2014 conference held at the Brock University in Ontario.
My first session yesterday was with Glenn Wright. I have been wanting to attend one of his presentations for the past couple of years and I am happy I did.
The session with Glenn was focused on Canada World War I service records and getting the most out of those service records many of us have sitting on a shelf at home. The first thing to help us gather the most from those records is to create a time-line of them. Start with their enlistment and work your way through the records until you get to their demobilization papers. This will give you a great working perspective to research further into the records. Once you have gathered all the information in a much easier to use format you can then proceed to the Library and Archives website and peek at those war diaries that have been added. You can then get even more details on your ancestors time in the war!
I must have about 20 of those files at home and have decided my #1 project will be to create these time lines.
This is a wonderful project just in time for the 100th anniversary of the Great War!

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