My Genetic Communities

This morning Ancestry DNA has rolled out their new feature called Genetic Communities. I have done the majority of my DNA testing at Family Tree DNA so I do not have very many tests I can check at Ancestry.

My mother is grouped into two communities. The first one is the Connacht Irish which is no surprise to me as that is the area her McMahon line is from, but the person that is highlighted within her circle is her great grandmother Mary Loftus.Screen Shot 2017-03-28 at 7.19.59 AM.png

The other group my mom falls into is the English Midlands. I immediately realize that it has picked up her Harrop line. Lewis Harrop was born about 1800 in Lancashire, England. Little is known about Lewis’ life other than he married in the USA about 1835 and came to Canada with his wife and kids in the 1850s.

 

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Genetic Community – English Midland

A look at my results include the Connacht Irish like my mother but I also have Munster Irish. I thought my Donegal roots would show up but neither my brother or my results picked that up. I have two ancestor groups that fall into the Munster community, the Hodgins family from Tipperary and my Melody family from Galway.Screen Shot 2017-03-28 at 7.38.03 AM

 

I think my brother’s results were the biggest surprise. His first community like me and my mother show Connacht Irish. The surprise is the second community, Southern English. Our Norton family from Great Yarmouth is the connection to this area and my brother is the great great grandson of the immigrant ancestor!

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Very cool to see this line show up. Once you have processed the results you can then explore your Genetic Community matches!

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Well done, ancestry for giving us this added tool for exploring where our DNA takes us!

My only wish is that all the people I have tested at Family Tree DNA could somehow access this amazing new Genetic Community feature!

 

Working on Ships in 1800s

Jeremiah Norton was a carpenter on various ships throughout his career. Jeremiah was born in Great Yarmouth on the 29th of August in 1781, he stood a modest 5’4″ and set sail in 1805 at the age of 24 years. An anchor and a half moon tattoo was proudly displayed his on his left hand.

When he first went to sea he was already married, to Elizabeth Jillings, in Great Yarmouth at St. Nicholas Church (image of the Church in 1848). I was able to locate baptisms for five of his children, Mary Ann, Lee Thomas, Richard Lee, Martha and Edward from the years 1811-1825. During this time I assume he was often away on his sea voyages.

With help, I have located seven of the ships he sailed on; Agenoria, Medora, Elizabeth, Cygnet, Campbell, Lang and his final ship was the Norma in 1846. The majority of the destinations of these ships were Jamaica, but the Cygnet took Jeremiah to Quebec in 1838.

Jeremiah and his family eventually left Yarmouth and relocated to Shadwell, near London.  Jeremiah died at sea on the Norma when he was 65 years young and left a love of shipping to his sons. Edward went to sea when he was 14, Lee Thomas/Thomas Lee in 1831 and Richard worked on ships in Quebec where he resided.

 

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Photo found on Pixabay 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Brock Family of Hackney

My connection to the Brock family was not an obvious one. It all started with a four-page letter written by a niece to her uncle in 1883. This letter must have been important as it was passed down through my family until I rediscovered it in 1993, one hundred and ten years after it was written.

I often would stop by and visit my dad, completely take over his living room by dragging out bins of long since stored away papers, photos, and paraphernalia.  Hours were spent going through the piles, learning all I could from disinterested family members. I remember first discovering the letter, unfolding it, reading the names for the first time. The questions it raised were not answered. Eventually, the bins were handed off to me and I could peruse them at my leisure, which I did.

At home, I would sit on my slow dial-up internet connection searching the few genealogical sites that were available and slowly the Brock family story started to unfold. The letter was addressed to “Dear Uncle and Aunt” Screen Shot 2015-09-17 at 4.51.12 PMand signed M and R Brock Screen Shot 2015-09-17 at 4.49.29 PMrevealed a few names, places and thankfully it was dated Dec. 14, 1883. The two locations mentioned were 93 Glenarm Road, Clapton and an Aunt still living in Great Yarmouth. A later discovery revealed that my great great great grandfather Richard Lee Norton was born in Great Yarmouth, aha! Next lead was searching the 1881 census which was on CD at my local Family History Library. The Brock family living at 93 Glenarm Road in Clapton consisted of four children as both parents were deceased as the letter had indicated. The census listed the oldest brother Richard, Martha and two younger brothers, Edward, and Henry. Further digging led me to the connection, the children’s mother Martha (Norton) Brock was my three times great grandfather’s sister, both born in Great Yarmouth.

Richard Brock's birth registration.

Richard Brock’s birth registration. Mother listed as Martha (Norton) Brock.

The letter, written two years after the census was to their Uncle Richard. The four had been on their own since their father passed away and appear to have stayed in close contact with him.

Robert Brock's death registration

Robert Brock’s death registration in 1879 of bronchitis.

Richard a ship captain had left England and married in Quebec City in 1854. Maybe he was sending them money to help out the expenses? The letter was informing their “Dear Uncle” of the loss of brother Henry and the problems they were having with their youngest brother Edward.

Edward seems to have been a difficult sibling, Richard and Martha were having a hard time supporting him. The letter states that Edward had been out of work since the death of their father (Robert d.1879). Edward convinced his siblings he would be better off in New York and it seems they pooled their money to make this trip a reality. New York bound, he didn’t stay long it, the letter shares that he was back and when they asked why he was returning his reply, “I have altered my mind”. This leaves me wondering if he ever left, perhaps he stayed in England and blew through the money. You may wonder why I am so cynical? It was my latest discovery that makes me wonder.

I have spent some time researching through Newspapers.com recently when I realized they also cover English newspapers. I went through the list of relatives that hailed from England, I typed in Richard Brock and came across more information on Edward and his exploits.

The Times (London, Greater London, England) pg.9 Charge Of Stealing From A Brother Aug. 20, 1883

The Times (London, Greater London, England) pg.9
Charge Of Stealing From A Brother Aug. 20, 1883

I have transcribed the news article below.

Worship-street Police-court on Saturday, Edward Brock, 22, brass-finisher, of Glenarm-road, Clapton, was charged with having stolen from the front parlour of 93, Glenarm road, a silver-plated prize cup, value £1 10s., the property of Richard Brock. The prosecutor said the prisoner was his brother and lived with him at the address mentioned. The cup in question, which had been won at a race, was kept in their front parlour. On Thursday evening it was found that the parlour had been broken open, and on an examination being made of the contents of the room the prize cup was missed. The matter was then put in the hands of the police. A pawnbroker from Mare-street, Hackney stated that the cup produced was pledged at his shop by the prisoner on Thursday for 4s. The prisoner then gave the name of John Brock. Detective Fletcher, of the R Division, said he had made inquiries in this case, and had discovered that the prisoner was an idle man and a great trouble to his family. When taken into custody he said, “I do no think you can call it a theft to take away a brother’s property.” The prisoner, who did not appear to be perfectly sane, asked Mr. Bushby if he could be charged with stealing if he promised to return the cup to his brother. The magistrate said he should convict him of unlawfully pawning the cup, the prosecutor having stated that he never gave him leave to obtain money upon it, and for that offence he would be fined 40s ; in default of distress one month’s imprisonment. The prisoner said he owned a couple of houses and could easily pay the penalty. The brother applied for a warrant of distress, as the prisoner had no money or goods, and he wished to see him punished for what he had done. The warrant was granted.

Found on Newspapers.com

http://www.newspapers.com/image/33145644/?terms=%22richard%2Bbrock%22

The news clipping predates the letter I had found by about 4 months. It tells me the siblings were doing all the could to help their brother but as I have learned, people need to help themselves. If Edward was going to make a change in North America wouldn’t he want to come to Canada and seek help from his Uncle? That is why I question if he made the trip at all.

I have followed Richard Brock through the censuses, he raised his family at the same address in Hackney. I have yet to learn what happened to Edward but I can only hope he made a change. Then again I have to think it is because of Edward that I know a little more about the Brock family in Hackney.

Tracking Peter Jordan in the Quebec City Directory

Peter Jordan c.1904, he did juggling for sport.

Peter Jordan c.1904, he did juggling for sport.

A wonderfully useful tool when tracking an ancestor’s movements is the City Directories. My ancestor Peter Jordan was born in 1878 in Quebec City, in the 1881 census he is living with his grandparent’s as his father was a widow and off soldiering in Kingston, ON.

In the 1891 census Peter is reunited with his father, brother Samuel, a new mother Agnes and 3 more siblings Mary, John Brown and William.

Jordan Family 1891 Quebec City Census St. Louis Ward p.77

Jordan Family, 1891 Quebec City Census, St. Louis Ward p.77

Peter was married Oct. 22, 1900, in St. Matthew’s Anglican Church in Quebec City to Caroline Norton.

Peter & Caroline (Norton) Jordan's marriage record from St. Matthew's Anglican Church, Quebec City.

Peter & Caroline (Norton) Jordan’s marriage record from St. Matthew’s Anglican Church, Quebec City.

They had signed a marriage contract two days before their wedding, which I found thanks to the Quebec Archives.

Searching the 1901 census has been futile. I have tried many variations but I have not been able to find Peter in the census. I have yet to sit down and scroll through page by page. On September 28, 1901, their first child was born, Beatrice was baptized Oct. 13, 1901.

Since I can’t find them in the census and I know they later make a move to Montreal I decided to utilize the Quebec City Directories that are on-line at the Quebec Archives /Banq.

1898-1901 – No Peter Jordan in the directory.

Peter does start showing up in the Directories in 1902-1903 and his is occupation is listed as a laundry-express driver and living at Conroy Street in house/apartment 21.

Following Peter through the directories we know he had many different jobs as well we learn where the family lived. Later I could use this information to try and find a photo of the family home.

What I have been able to learn so far is:

1904/05 – Peter worked in a restaurant at St. Louis 86 1/2, the family has relocated from 21 to 12 Conroy Street (unless this was a misprint in the directory). This is the year their son Peter was born August 31.

1905/06 – He was the proprietor of the Mikado Restaraunt on Palace St. (it doesn’t list his home address). A son Samuel joins the family Nov. 4, 1906.

1906/07 – Peter has again switched jobs and is managing The Eastern Provision Co. and his address is given as Conroy 12.

1907/08 – No Peter Jordan listed.

1908/09 – There is a Mrs. Peter Jordan living at St. Patrick’s Street.

1909/10 – this could be when the family moved because I cannot find them in any subsequent directories.

The Jordan family is found in the 1911 Montreal census and is living at 518 Cartier Street.

Their last child Herbert William joined the family August 12, 1914.

Next up will be following the family through the Montreal Directories which are also on the Archives website.

The Jordan family. L-R Peter, Herb with mother Caroline, Beatrice and Samuel in the front. Montreal c.1915.

The Jordan family.
L-R — Peter Jr., Herb with mother Caroline, Beatrice and Samuel in the front.
Montreal c.1915.

Fearless Female – A Photo

Caroline Norton

Caroline Norton

March 2 — Post a photo of one of your female ancestors.  Who is in the photo?  When was it taken?  Why did you select this photo?

Pictured above is Caroline Louisa Norton, my great Grandmother. Caroline was born in 1877 in Quebec City the daughter of Richard Lee Norton & Hannah Pozer Jeffery.

Caroline lived in Quebec City where she married Peter John Jordan in 1900 and they moved to Montreal in 1909. Her husband was a salesman later opening a tobacco shop in Montreal on Papineau Ave.

This photo of Caroline was taken about 1895 in Quebec City when Caroline would have been 18 years old.

I selected this photo because I love the clothing, her hair style and it is one of the few photos that I have of her as a young lady.

An Anniversary – 114 Years Ago Today

Peter Jordan married Caroline Louisa Norton on this day 114 years ago, October 22, 1900. They were my great grandparents, my paternal grandmother’s parents to be more exact.

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Peter and Caroline were both living in Quebec City when they signed a marriage contract on October 20 and were married 2 days later at St. Mathew’s Church in Quebec City. Witnesses to their marriage was J.B. Jordan (Peter’s 1/2 brother) and Maude Hallett (possibly a friend). Peter & Caroline quickly disappear as I have not located them in the 1901 census but on September 30, 1901 their first child Beatrice Mary Victoria Jordan was born in Quebec City. The family’s next three children were boys Samuel, Allan & Herbert who was born in Montreal.

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L-R Allan, Herbert with his mom Caroline, Beatrice and Samuel in front. Photo taken about 1915 in Montreal.

Peter was a salesman later owning a tobacco shop on 179 McGill Street in Montreal.

Peter & Caroline celebrated their 50th anniversary with friends and family in attendance.

IMG_4278 Although I did not have the pleasure of knowing either of them, as Caroline died in 1958 and Peter in 1967, I would have liked to have had the opportunity. Today I remember them and celebrate their 58 years of marriage.

52 Ancestors – Elizabeth Norton #11

Lizzie Norton Autograph book copy 2

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=j03XQi5toQg

This is my way of sharing an autograph book that belonged to my great great grandmother’s sister Elizabeth Norton. Elizabeth was born in 1862 in Quebec City to parents Richard Lee Norton and Hannah Pozer Jeffrey.

Elizabeth spent her life in Quebec City, she married James O’Grady in 1891 and although she had 3 children she left no descendants. Elizabeth passed away in 1897 at the age of 34, and none of her children lived past infancy. Her sister kept and treasured her autograph book and it has passed down through the family. I have been wanting to find a way to share this book and came up with the idea of putting it into a video. Please take some time to view it, I think you may like it!

The album contains the signatures of –

Tess
May H.
Odile Jeffery
Blanche Jeffery
Victor P. Simpson
R J Norton (Richard Jeffery Norton – brother)
Carrie Norton (sister)
Ida Crawford
J. O. G. – (future husband James O’Grady)
N. G. Fellows
Mrs. Fellows
Addie Higgins (Adelaide Higgins)
Emmy Higgins (Emily Higgins)
G. PLante
Blanche Jeffery (cousin)
Odile Jeffery (cousin)
Susie Mathews
Granny Romeril
E. Dyers
Willie Fountain

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=j03XQi5toQg