Airport Fun

I am sitting in the Edmonton airport waiting for the start of what in my mind is my ‘trip of a lifetime’. Although not purely a research trip, more of an exploratory journey, I will be doing some genealogy research. I plan to stay close or in the communities that I know my family has resided,  and I look forward to talking locals, exploring churches, cemeteries and breathing the Irish air. To pass the time I made a list of my Irish immigrant ancestors and where they were from. 

Out of 12 people I have a known location in Ireland for 5, I only know the Counties for 2, which leaves me with 5 that have the empty designation of unknown.

Ancestors name | Date of Immigration | Immigrated From | Location in Canada | Connection to me

1. Mary Potter – [ca.1820] unknown location -> Goulbourn, Carleton Co., Ontario – 3x great grandmother

2. Cornelius McMahon – 1850 Co. Clare -> Sherbrooke, Quebec -. Normanby Twp, Grey Co., Ontario – 2x great grandfather

3. Sarah McCue – unknown date, unknown place -> Normanby Twp, Grey CO., Ontario – 2 x great grandmother
4. Margaret Pendergast with parents Thomas Pendergast & Margaret Walsh – ca. 1830s – Mooncoin, Kilkenny -> Quebec City – 3x great grandmother

5. Thomas Hodgins – [ca.1812] – Dromineer, Tipperary -> Huntley, Carleton CO., Ontario – 4x great grandfather

6. Thomas Reddy – [ca.1840] – unknown place (possibly Kilkenny) -> Quebec City – 3x great grandfather 

7. Samuel Jordan – [before 1852] unknown place -> Quebec City – 3x great grandfather

8. Mary Quigley – wife of Samuel Jordan [before 1852 ] -> Quebec City – 3x great grandmother

9. Mary Loftus – [unknown date] – unknown place –  arrived with husband Felix McGowan to New York -> West Flamboro, Wentworth Co., Ontario – 2x great grandmother

10. Bridget Melody – 1879 – New Inn, Galway -> Montreal, Quebec

11. James Diver with wife Sarah Cheatley – 1862 – Milford, Donegal -> Picton, Prince Edward Co., Ontario – 2x great grandparents

12. Sarah Cheatley – 1862 – Milford, Donegal -> same as her husband James Diver (Sarah was from Dromore, Donegal)

Summary

List of Irish Counties – Clare, Galway, Sligo, Tipperary, Kilkenny, Donegal, 6 unknown

Earliest arrival was Thomas Hodgins ca. 1812

Latest arrival was Bridget Melody in 1879

Possible Famine immigration – McMahon, McCue, Reddy, Jordan, Quigley

Canadian Orders-In-Council & Genealogy

Yesterday I spent some time searching on-line at the Library and Archives Canada’s website focusing on the Orders in Council. The records cover the years 1867-1924, and are further explained on the site as:

A federal Order-in-Council is a legal instrument made by the Governor in Council pursuant to a statutory authority or, less frequently, the royal prerogative. All orders in council are made on the recommendation of the responsible Minister of the Crown and take legal effect only when signed by the Governor General.

My first thought was to search for the regiment that my 3 x great-grandfather William Jordan was a member of, “B” Battery of the Royal Canadian Artillery. There were 170 results  for this search which helped me to follow the movements of the regiment while he was serving with them.

I then decided I would do a search for the Jordan surname. This brought up 54 results which were easy to look through to see if any pertained to my Jordan family. One record was a great surprise, William Jordan’s retirement was recorded in 1905 with an order-in-council approving his pension a year later.

screen-shot-2016-11-26-at-11-01-23-pm

The digital copy of the record is available for viewing on the website and shows William’s pension was signed by Wilfred Laurier the seventh Prime Minister of Canada. Laurier approved the application for William’s pension after his thirty-three years serving as a soldier.

screen-shot-2016-11-26-at-11-06-39-pm

screen shot of the record on the order-in-council from the Library and Archives website.

William came out of retirement two years later and served with the 8th Royal Rifles until 1914. With the onset of WWI, William then went to Little River and worked as a shell inspector, he was sixty-two years old. William’s full career spanned forty-six years, a notable length of time.

screen-shot-2016-11-27-at-12-59-17-pm

William Jordan, 1930.

I encourage researchers to have a look at the Orders-In-Council on the LAC website and be creative with your searches. I suggest not only searching your ancestor’s name but also try a location or a subject like a military regiment, you never know what you will discover.

A Fine Celebration

One of the things that I inherited from my grandmother Beatrice (Jordan) Dever was a Royal Canadian Artillery reunion booklet.  She may have attended the event or collected it as her grandfather William Robert Jordan was honoured at the event. The reunion was held in Kingston, Ontario and was reported in the Kingston Whig-Standard on May 23, 1930.

William attended, placing a wreath on the R.C.H.A. memorial along with Mr. W.R. Abbott and Major General R.W. Rutherford.

The reunion booklet contains the programme, the committee members, a history of the regiment and photographs of members.

I have scanned the front page.

Screen Shot 2016-06-26 at 9.07.34 PM

Cover of the reunion booklet.

 

The Royal Artillery Museum has a write up about William Robert Jordan on their website.

Sergeants’ Mess

This photograph of Sergeants’ Mess was probably taken in Quebec City, I came across it on a visit to my great Uncle Herbert Jordan who lived in Montreal. The photograph belonged to his grandfather William Jordan who was a Sergeant in the Canadian Artillery in the 1880s. He started out as a bugler during the Fenian Raids with the Eighth Royal Rifles and served in the Jesuit Barracks in 1870 when he was eighteen years old. He first joined the Eighth Royal Rifles in 1866 as a bugler and later in the Northwest Rebellion where he was promoted to Sergeant.

William had the distinction as being the first to sound call and act as sentry for the Royal Artillery when they took over the Citadel from the 60th Rifles of the Imperial Army in 1871.

He was in the Northwest campaign in 1885 and it was here that attained the rank of Sergeant but he also damaged his hearing due to his proximity to the guns. He also was a bugler and trumpet instructor and then later a gymnasium instructor at the Citadel.

I would dearly love to know in what building this photograph was taken. I haven’t been able to pick him out in the photograph and wonder if he is even in it…I also had to stitch it together the best I could as my scanner bed isn’t big enough for the picture.

 

William Jordan_1

William Jordan c.1880

 

Jordan, William older

William Jordan abt. 1935.

Arrested at Age 8 -Anne Reddy’s Story

A sad Irish tale in Quebec City.

The Morrin Center is one of the places I visited on a recent trip to Quebec City. It is now home to the Quebec Literary and Historical Society which have called this building home since 1868. Previous to this it was the city jail. I am particularly interested in this as I have found multiple records that indicate my great great grandmother Anne Reddy had been arrested starting the age of eight. On the tour, we were able to view the cells that the prisoners were housed in the basement of the building. When we descended to the basement and walked into the cells I found it stifling. I cannot imagine what it would have been like back in the 1860s with all the prisoners and the unwashed bodies. It would have been unbearable.

IMG_7641

During the tour, our guide explained that the men were housed in this building and the women and children were actually kept across the street in a separate building.

My great great grandmother Anne Reddy was born in Quebec City to parents Thomas Ready/Reddy a labourer and Margaret Pendergast. Anastasia (Anne)  and her twin sister Cecilia were baptized together at Notre-Dame Catholic Church on the 16th of February 1854. In 1862 at the age of thirty-five Anne’s mother Margaret died by ‘an act of god’ according to the coroner’s report, leaving five children, the youngest being the twin girls.

Searching through the Quebec Archives website I was surprised to see the Reddy name appear. It took a while before I did a search for each of Anne’s siblings and their names kept appearing under the Quebec Prisoners in the 19th Century. I ended up creating a spreadsheet so I could see if the information correlated with my tree. I have arrived at the conclusion that many of the Reddy arrests are my gggrandmother Anne and her siblings. According to what I have been able to glean off the archives site Cecilia was arrested nine times, mostly in 1865, Mary twenty-nine times, Bridget eight times, the father once and Anne herself nines times with seven of the arrests between 1865-66.

I am not sure what happened to the Reddy family but what I do know is that their mother Margaret died in 1862 and I can only assume that things quickly deteriorated in their home.

Anne died at the age of 26, she had given birth by this time to seven children, two of whom died within a day of each other at the age of two & five years old. Her only surviving children were Samuel & Peter Jordan. Peter who is my great grandfather lost his mother when he was two. I will continue to pursue this on his behalf and uncover more of the Reddy family’s story.

Gail Dever at Genealogy à la carte has posted that there is a new book being released on the Morrin Center that I look forward to reading!

JORDAN (Reddy), Anne copy

What I think is Anne’s & her children’s marker in St. Patrick’s Cemetery, Quebec City. Sadly this is now gone and there is nothing at the cemetery to indicate her grave.

I did inquire if there was more information on these arrested at the archives but was told that there was not in the cases of ‘loose, idle & disorderly‘. I do think that there is more that can be explored here and I will post my finds on the Reddy family.

I have yet to discover where in Ireland Thomas Reddy the father was from but who knows what the records will reveal!

P.S. This was not the only ancestor in my tree that was arrested. Robert Jeffery who I have written appears to have actually spent time in this jail.

 

John Brown Jordan & His WWI Service

John Brown Jordan was born August 12, 1888, to parents William and Agnes Brown in Kingston, Ontario. It is not surprising he heeded the call to serve in WWI as his father was a career soldier, as well as his older brother Samuel. John was not new to soldering, he already served nine years with the Royal Canadian Artillery and seven years with the Canadian Army Service Corps. John married to Celina Collins in 1905 at St. Matthew’s Church, Quebec City and they had three children, Celina Agnes Becroft (Bee) born in 1906, John William Sidney (Syd) born in 1908 and Mary Patricia arrived in 1913.

John enlisted September 10, 1914, and is described as fresh complected, with dark blue eyes and medium brown hair. He wasn’t the tallest in stature measuring in at 5’4”.

He sailed on the S.S. Alaunia which transported the first Canadian troops to head overseas. John left for France July 19, 1915, joining the 3rd division and was mentioned in dispatches Dec. 28, 1917. John’s daughter Mary Patricia died while he was gone in 1918. John survived the duration of the war and returned to Canada Sept. 6, 1919, sailing on the S.S. Minnekahda.

John continued working for the military, returning to England and working there as a clerk to the Imperial War Graves Association. John and his wife Celina divorced, and John married Rose Emma Matthews Davis, a widow from England. Rose and John’s only child, a son Leslie was born in 1921 in England.

Leslie also became involved in the military, in WWII he was a Flight Seargent with 108 Squadron. Leslie’s plane crashed in Dundalk, Ireland killing seventeen people. Leslie is remembered on a plaque in Brighton (Downs) Crematorium in England.

John Brown returned to Canada after WWII, and he and his wife settled back in Kingston.

Screen Shot 2015-11-05 at 5.42.35 PM

Rose and John Brown Jordan visiting relatives in Montreal. c1950 

John died there in 1951; he is buried at Cataraqui Cemetery.

  • A memory that told to me by John’s nephew, Herbert Jordan was that John was very hard to understand as he had been gassed during the war and had a hole in his throat.

Tracking Peter Jordan in the Quebec City Directory

Peter Jordan c.1904, he did juggling for sport.

Peter Jordan c.1904, he did juggling for sport.

A wonderfully useful tool when tracking an ancestor’s movements is the City Directories. My ancestor Peter Jordan was born in 1878 in Quebec City, in the 1881 census he is living with his grandparent’s as his father was a widow and off soldiering in Kingston, ON.

In the 1891 census Peter is reunited with his father, brother Samuel, a new mother Agnes and 3 more siblings Mary, John Brown and William.

Jordan Family 1891 Quebec City Census St. Louis Ward p.77

Jordan Family, 1891 Quebec City Census, St. Louis Ward p.77

Peter was married Oct. 22, 1900, in St. Matthew’s Anglican Church in Quebec City to Caroline Norton.

Peter & Caroline (Norton) Jordan's marriage record from St. Matthew's Anglican Church, Quebec City.

Peter & Caroline (Norton) Jordan’s marriage record from St. Matthew’s Anglican Church, Quebec City.

They had signed a marriage contract two days before their wedding, which I found thanks to the Quebec Archives.

Searching the 1901 census has been futile. I have tried many variations but I have not been able to find Peter in the census. I have yet to sit down and scroll through page by page. On September 28, 1901, their first child was born, Beatrice was baptized Oct. 13, 1901.

Since I can’t find them in the census and I know they later make a move to Montreal I decided to utilize the Quebec City Directories that are on-line at the Quebec Archives /Banq.

1898-1901 – No Peter Jordan in the directory.

Peter does start showing up in the Directories in 1902-1903 and his is occupation is listed as a laundry-express driver and living at Conroy Street in house/apartment 21.

Following Peter through the directories we know he had many different jobs as well we learn where the family lived. Later I could use this information to try and find a photo of the family home.

What I have been able to learn so far is:

1904/05 – Peter worked in a restaurant at St. Louis 86 1/2, the family has relocated from 21 to 12 Conroy Street (unless this was a misprint in the directory). This is the year their son Peter was born August 31.

1905/06 – He was the proprietor of the Mikado Restaraunt on Palace St. (it doesn’t list his home address). A son Samuel joins the family Nov. 4, 1906.

1906/07 – Peter has again switched jobs and is managing The Eastern Provision Co. and his address is given as Conroy 12.

1907/08 – No Peter Jordan listed.

1908/09 – There is a Mrs. Peter Jordan living at St. Patrick’s Street.

1909/10 – this could be when the family moved because I cannot find them in any subsequent directories.

The Jordan family is found in the 1911 Montreal census and is living at 518 Cartier Street.

Their last child Herbert William joined the family August 12, 1914.

Next up will be following the family through the Montreal Directories which are also on the Archives website.

The Jordan family. L-R Peter, Herb with mother Caroline, Beatrice and Samuel in the front. Montreal c.1915.

The Jordan family.
L-R — Peter Jr., Herb with mother Caroline, Beatrice and Samuel in the front.
Montreal c.1915.