My Genetic Communities

This morning Ancestry DNA has rolled out their new feature called Genetic Communities. I have done the majority of my DNA testing at Family Tree DNA so I do not have very many tests I can check at Ancestry.

My mother is grouped into two communities. The first one is the Connacht Irish which is no surprise to me as that is the area her McMahon line is from, but the person that is highlighted within her circle is her great grandmother Mary Loftus.Screen Shot 2017-03-28 at 7.19.59 AM.png

The other group my mom falls into is the English Midlands. I immediately realize that it has picked up her Harrop line. Lewis Harrop was born about 1800 in Lancashire, England. Little is known about Lewis’ life other than he married in the USA about 1835 and came to Canada with his wife and kids in the 1850s.

 

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Genetic Community – English Midland

A look at my results include the Connacht Irish like my mother but I also have Munster Irish. I thought my Donegal roots would show up but neither my brother or my results picked that up. I have two ancestor groups that fall into the Munster community, the Hodgins family from Tipperary and my Melody family from Galway.Screen Shot 2017-03-28 at 7.38.03 AM

 

I think my brother’s results were the biggest surprise. His first community like me and my mother show Connacht Irish. The surprise is the second community, Southern English. Our Norton family from Great Yarmouth is the connection to this area and my brother is the great great grandson of the immigrant ancestor!

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Very cool to see this line show up. Once you have processed the results you can then explore your Genetic Community matches!

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Well done, ancestry for giving us this added tool for exploring where our DNA takes us!

My only wish is that all the people I have tested at Family Tree DNA could somehow access this amazing new Genetic Community feature!

 

Arrested at Age 8 -Anne Reddy’s Story

A sad Irish tale in Quebec City.

The Morrin Center is one of the places I visited on a recent trip to Quebec City. It is now home to the Quebec Literary and Historical Society which have called this building home since 1868. Previous to this it was the city jail. I am particularly interested in this as I have found multiple records that indicate my great great grandmother Anne Reddy had been arrested starting the age of eight. On the tour, we were able to view the cells that the prisoners were housed in the basement of the building. When we descended to the basement and walked into the cells I found it stifling. I cannot imagine what it would have been like back in the 1860s with all the prisoners and the unwashed bodies. It would have been unbearable.

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During the tour, our guide explained that the men were housed in this building and the women and children were actually kept across the street in a separate building.

My great great grandmother Anne Reddy was born in Quebec City to parents Thomas Ready/Reddy a labourer and Margaret Pendergast. Anastasia (Anne)  and her twin sister Cecilia were baptized together at Notre-Dame Catholic Church on the 16th of February 1854. In 1862 at the age of thirty-five Anne’s mother Margaret died by ‘an act of god’ according to the coroner’s report, leaving five children, the youngest being the twin girls.

Searching through the Quebec Archives website I was surprised to see the Reddy name appear. It took a while before I did a search for each of Anne’s siblings and their names kept appearing under the Quebec Prisoners in the 19th Century. I ended up creating a spreadsheet so I could see if the information correlated with my tree. I have arrived at the conclusion that many of the Reddy arrests are my gggrandmother Anne and her siblings. According to what I have been able to glean off the archives site Cecilia was arrested nine times, mostly in 1865, Mary twenty-nine times, Bridget eight times, the father once and Anne herself nines times with seven of the arrests between 1865-66.

I am not sure what happened to the Reddy family but what I do know is that their mother Margaret died in 1862 and I can only assume that things quickly deteriorated in their home.

Anne died at the age of 26, she had given birth by this time to seven children, two of whom died within a day of each other at the age of two & five years old. Her only surviving children were Samuel & Peter Jordan. Peter who is my great grandfather lost his mother when he was two. I will continue to pursue this on his behalf and uncover more of the Reddy family’s story.

Gail Dever at Genealogy à la carte has posted that there is a new book being released on the Morrin Center that I look forward to reading!

JORDAN (Reddy), Anne copy

What I think is Anne’s & her children’s marker in St. Patrick’s Cemetery, Quebec City. Sadly this is now gone and there is nothing at the cemetery to indicate her grave.

I did inquire if there was more information on these arrested at the archives but was told that there was not in the cases of ‘loose, idle & disorderly‘. I do think that there is more that can be explored here and I will post my finds on the Reddy family.

I have yet to discover where in Ireland Thomas Reddy the father was from but who knows what the records will reveal!

P.S. This was not the only ancestor in my tree that was arrested. Robert Jeffery who I have written appears to have actually spent time in this jail.