Charting Religion in Your Tree

After learning about the focus by Find My Past on Catholic records while watching the live-stream at RootsTech, I started to mentally calculate who in my family I may find in these new records. One by one I was eliminating people that this new record set won’t include, but quickly felt I needed to have a tool so I could visually my ancestor’s religion.

How To Make Your Own Chart

And aha! I remembered the genealogy sensation that was caused when J. Paul Hawthorne created and shared his birthplace chart. It was a great visual tool people quickly started using to see birth locations of people in their pedigree chart. I also recalled a blog post by Miriam J. Robbins at AnceStories: The Stories of My Ancestors which walked us through the process of creating our own chart.

My Chart

After following her how to guide I filled out my chart in with the different religions of each ancestor in my pedigree chart.

screen-shot-2017-02-10-at-1-00-41-pm

 

 

Now I can easily see which family line I need to focus on for these Catholic records, or for other records sets as well.

 

Ontario Genealogy Conference 2017 Adds Another Day of Learning

Ontario Genealogical Society’s 2017 Conference that will be held in Ottawa  June 15-18, has added an aptly named Ancestry Day to take place on June 19th.

The Conference already has a full weekend of genealogy learning starting with their excursions on Thursday (* the trip to Library and Archives Canada is already full) followed by three days of sessions. The fourth day will take place on Monday the 19th.

The Ancestry Day schedule covers

  • Getting the Most Out of Ancestry 1&2
  • DNA: Testing Everything You Need to Know
  • Adding Genetic Evidence to Your Family Tree
  • Sharing Your Story

This great line up of talks will be given by speakers Crista Cowan and Anna Swayne and they will also have Ancestry DNA kits on sale.

For those that have already registered you will have to go in and register separately for this added day. To register or find out more about Ancestry Day it is on the Conference Page under Special Events.

 

 

Making a Plan for 2017

I first started researching my family tree in the basement of my home which was located in a very remote place in Northern Alberta. I was a stay-at-home mom with two young children and was a tad lonely. I found I could research in small quick moments during the day and sometimes in the evening once the kids were tucked in. I was looking for some way to channel my love of family history and took a class offered by the local genealogy society, and I haven’t been able to stop since. I have to say it was very slap-dash and as I have learned not the most efficient way to approach this hobby.

What I didn’t know when I started researching my family tree –

  • how this hobby would branch out and become a full-time interest that would change the scope of family holidays, my free time, and my budget!
  • how important it is sourcing my information is! 
  • how much I wish would have focused more on writing in my English classes…
  • how much information would come on-line
  • that paper-less was an option
  • how much genealogy travel I would want to do

Now that I have gathered a fair bit of material, my goal with my research is to share it. And I don’t mean make my family tree public, what I am envisioning is a family history book with photographs, anecdotal stories, and some social history for context when I really don’t know all that much about an ancestor. With this in mind, I am setting my goal for 2017 to produce a family history book. How will I make this goal my focus for the year?

  • when selecting courses/webinars I will make choices with my goal in mind
  • the same can be said when selecting what sessions I will attend at conferences
  • join Facebook groups with writing as the focus
  • set specific writing goals – to sit down to work on my project three times a weekscreen-shot-2016-12-30-at-12-34-45-pm

This doesn’t mean I will stop researching but the thought of having a finished product to show the next time my family gathers is a vision that I cannot get out of my head!

Setting a goal with my genealogy research was not on my radar when I first started. Now I can see how it will help me to stay the course and have a focused plan for the year.

Have you set your 2017 genealogy goals? I would love to hear what you have planned.

3 Ways Genealogy Conferences Rock

Why attend a conference? That’s a good question and one it took me a bit to answer.

  1. Learning! Do you know it all? No? Me either, so a conference is a great way to learn from speakers face-to-face. And do you know what? I think every speaker I listened to at OGS 2016 gave out their e-mail addresses, told people to write to them with questions, and…they stuck around their session, just to answer questions!
  2. The expo hall is full of resources, books, genealogy groups who are there to help. And they are happy to!
  3. Networking!! Huge! You meet people, and they may be researching where your ancestors lived. They might have access to resources that aren’t on-line, and fingers-crossed, may offer to do a look up or two for you!

This happened to me at the Ontario conference. I had a friend who had a friend… who has access to the archives in Quebec, and she offered to help me with some research. I sent her an e-mail when I arrived home and Bingo – she’s going to see what she can find.

Needless to say, I may have gotten a little carried away when I first sent her an e-mail and gave her the information I had on Richard Lee Norton. And while I was looking through his records I was reminded that his mother-in-law owned a house in Quebec City at 43 St. Ursule Street in the 1850s…so I told her about her. Oh but then I also remembered that her brother-in-law owned the London Coffee House in Quebec City in the 1860s, so I asked how I would access any records from that. There may have been a couple other people I had some questions about as well. Too many questions? YES! I was so excited I couldn’t stop myself, and I didn’t want said genealogist to say later that she could’ve looked for that record has she known. So I laid it all out, well not all but a lot! (I actually did hold back some questions). I also was very clear that she could just point me in a direction and I would be very happy to do it myself. It is very satisfying to be able to ask specific questions to someone who knows how to access the records!

Back to the idea of going to a conference, I would say GO, hurry and GO. Who knows what you will gain from it? What I know is it may lead me to getting answers to  questions I have had for about ten years!

Maybe there is a trip to Quebec in my future and with some guidence may finally make some progress on this family!

P.S. I don’t want to name names in case she gets bombarded with questions but a huge shout out to Gail and Sharon, you know why!

Create Family History Videos

One of the things I learned while attending the OCG 2016 Conference in Toronto was to continue to work on using video to share family stories. Thanks to a session given by Lisa Louise Cooke on How to Create and Leverage Your Own You Tube Channel for Genealogy and her suggestion of Animoto as user-friendly I took the time to play with it. The video took about 20 minutes to create with most of my time spent gathering the photographs and adding the text. Animoto is quite easy to use, they do put a watermark on the video unless you upgrade, which costs $13 a month. This is not a bad a bad price but if I subscribe I would have some projects already prepared in folders and do more than one at a time.

Once on the Animoto site and create an account you can pick a theme from the choices offered. Next up is adding the photographs, drag and drop style. There are also text boxes that you can use to proceed the photographs, caption each one or both. Animoto even adds the music for you! I am sure there are more options but these are a few I used in my creation. I was then able to download my video which I uploaded to my You Tube channel. It was very seamless!

Animoto does put a watermark on the video unless you upgrade which has different options but runs $13 for a month. Although not a bad price I think if I subscribe I will have some projects gathered in folders ready to go and create more than one at a time. My reasoning for a month at a time is I seem to go in waves as far as what I am working on and what my time allows. All in all it was an easy experience and I can see where I can improve and expand my video.  Let me know if you give it a try!

Finding Margaret

You know when you first started doing your family tree and it seems that every time you hit the library you found something new? Well, that’s what my memory of first starting out researching my family tree was like. It probably was a bit more onerous than that, but it’s the discoveries that suck you in. It is like winning the lottery or sitting at a slot machine in Vegas (minus the flashing lights), you get a win and you are hooked. In genealogy, uncovering another record or breaking through a brick wall is the best feeling in the world! These discoveries do not occur as often, but the euphoria still happens every time.

Today was one of those days, I am thrilled to say! I have been on the hunt for my geat great grandmother’s sister for quite a few years. Margaret Jeffery was born Quebec City October 8, 1830, to parents Elizabeth Tipper and Robert Jeffery and her nine siblings, four of which died in infancy. A life of adventure was in store for her, when she was seventeen, she met and married George Humphry, a Captain of the aptly named ship the Margaret.

Chalmer's Presbyterian Church, Quebec City

Chalmer’s Presbyterian Church, Quebec City — witnesses were her sister Elizabeth and her husband Frederick Yeates.

The Morning Chronicle Oct. 30, 1847

The Morning Chronicle Oct. 30, 1847

Margaret moves to her husband’s home in Saint Sauveur, Devon, England, and children start arriving. First George, followed by Emily and then Margaret Adelaide. Little George, only lives four months, but Emily and Margaret survive infancy. Margaret and her children are back in Quebec City in 1858, the girls Emily and Margaret are baptized and husband George is listed as deceased on the baptism record.

St. Andrew's Presbyterian Church, Quebec City

Baptism of Emily & Margaret, St. Andrew’s Presbyterian Church, Quebec City — Hannah my 2x great grandmother signs with the mother Margaret.

Margaret appears to stay put marrying again in Quebec City. The marriage takes place at St. Andrew’s Presbyterian Church on September 8, 1864, and the groom is James J. Atkins. Further searching on the couple lead me to the birth record of Frannie Elizabeth. I wasn’t sure if this was the right family as the birth was in a Methodist church in Montreal. I next look for the family in New York, as I know daughter Margaret’s daughter Emily Humphry gets married there.

In the 1875 New York census I find this family and I think it could be them.

1875 census Kings, Brooklyn Ward, E.D. 3

1875 census
Kings, Brooklyn Ward, E.D. 3

The entry lists the Atkins family consisting of parents James, Margaret with children Addie, Fannie, Henry and Lillie. This family looks promising, it states the right birth places for everyone.

The clincher arrived in the mail today, I had ordered a marriage record for Frannie Atkins who married in New York. This Frannie I suspected to be from the family in the census. A longshot but I was feeling lucky! The marriage record arrived today for Frannie Elizabeth Atkins to Gerald Forest Burroughs taking place in Brooklyn, New York in 1886. Frannie’s parents were listed as… James J. Atkins and Margaret Jeffery,!!!! and Fannie is from QUEBEC!! Success! My gamble paid off and I am so happy I followed my hunch that this was her.

Frannie Atkins marries Gerald Burroughs

Frannie Atkins marries Gerald Burroughs

I was saddened to discover that Margaret (Jeffery) (Humphry) Atkins passed away in New York on July 30, 1878. I do hope to track down where she is buried and someday get an opportunity to pay my respects and connect with some Atkins cousins!

52 Ancestors – Elizabeth Norton #11

Lizzie Norton Autograph book copy 2

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=j03XQi5toQg

This is my way of sharing an autograph book that belonged to my great great grandmother’s sister Elizabeth Norton. Elizabeth was born in 1862 in Quebec City to parents Richard Lee Norton and Hannah Pozer Jeffrey.

Elizabeth spent her life in Quebec City, she married James O’Grady in 1891 and although she had 3 children she left no descendants. Elizabeth passed away in 1897 at the age of 34, and none of her children lived past infancy. Her sister kept and treasured her autograph book and it has passed down through the family. I have been wanting to find a way to share this book and came up with the idea of putting it into a video. Please take some time to view it, I think you may like it!

The album contains the signatures of –

Tess
May H.
Odile Jeffery
Blanche Jeffery
Victor P. Simpson
R J Norton (Richard Jeffery Norton – brother)
Carrie Norton (sister)
Ida Crawford
J. O. G. – (future husband James O’Grady)
N. G. Fellows
Mrs. Fellows
Addie Higgins (Adelaide Higgins)
Emmy Higgins (Emily Higgins)
G. PLante
Blanche Jeffery (cousin)
Odile Jeffery (cousin)
Susie Mathews
Granny Romeril
E. Dyers
Willie Fountain

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=j03XQi5toQg