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Canadian Orders-In-Council & Genealogy

Yesterday I spent some time searching on-line at the Library and Archives Canada’s website focusing on the Orders in Council. The records cover the years 1867-1924, and are further explained on the site as:

A federal Order-in-Council is a legal instrument made by the Governor in Council pursuant to a statutory authority or, less frequently, the royal prerogative. All orders in council are made on the recommendation of the responsible Minister of the Crown and take legal effect only when signed by the Governor General.

My first thought was to search for the regiment that my 3 x great-grandfather William Jordan was a member of, “B” Battery of the Royal Canadian Artillery. There were 170 results  for this search which helped me to follow the movements of the regiment while he was serving with them.

I then decided I would do a search for the Jordan surname. This brought up 54 results which were easy to look through to see if any pertained to my Jordan family. One record was a great surprise, William Jordan’s retirement was recorded in 1905 with an order-in-council approving his pension a year later.

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The digital copy of the record is available for viewing on the website and shows William’s pension was signed by Wilfred Laurier the seventh Prime Minister of Canada. Laurier approved the application for William’s pension after his thirty-three years serving as a soldier.

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screen shot of the record on the order-in-council from the Library and Archives website.

William came out of retirement two years later and served with the 8th Royal Rifles until 1914. With the onset of WWI, William then went to Little River and worked as a shell inspector, he was sixty-two years old. William’s full career spanned forty-six years, a notable length of time.

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William Jordan, 1930.

I encourage researchers to have a look at the Orders-In-Council on the LAC website and be creative with your searches. I suggest not only searching your ancestor’s name but also try a location or a subject like a military regiment, you never know what you will discover.

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Link your Tree to Your DNA Results on Ancestry

I would like to ask anyone who has done DNA testing at ancestry to link a tree to their test. You can make multiple trees at ancestry which means that you can create a DNA tree. This means that your whole family tree does not have to be made public.

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What I did is create a DNA tree which is now linked to my results. In doing that my DNA matches can quickly see if we have surnames or locations in common. It actually didn’t take too long and it makes my results more meaningful.

I would also encourage people to take this test. Ancestry’s DNA pool is growing and it is a wonderful way to find cousins, who knows they may have a picture of one of your ancestors that you don’t. Happy spitting everyone!

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Maps, Genealogy & Directionally Challenged Me

I am a directionally challenged person (my family gets a kick out of me getting lost leaving my hotel room) so I have generally avoided maps in my research. I may look things up quickly (thank goodness for google maps!) but I haven’t gone deeper.

Well, that is changing. With some wonderful advice from a knowledgeable researcher/author who has taken me under her wing, (Sharon you are my hero) I am getting better.

Today I wanted to find out more about the locations where my family was living in Quebec City in 1900. As per the wonderful instructions I was given I clicked over to the Quebec Archives website  Digital Maps and Plans Collection and I was determined to figure this out! (plus no one was watching to laugh at my missteps).

I am going to walk you through what I did with some screenshots for easier explanation. I started at the home page and under ‘Choose a Collection’ I selected ‘Plans de villes et villages du Quebec’.home-page-banqscreen-shot-2016-09-26-at-12-58-51-pm

I then chose the letter “Q” from the ‘Tous’ title and received three choices: ‘Region’, ‘Quebec, Quebec’ or ‘Quyon’. I chose number 2 which brought me to this page.date-selection-of-map-1898This brought up quite a few choices but I was looking for a map close to the 1900 date so I went with the Insurance plan of the City of Quebec 1898.

This opened up a series of thumbnails, I did notice the first thumbnail was an index and where I wanted to start.  Knowing that the family I was looking for was living on Conroy street I selected the Full-Screen option for easier reading. Once the fullscreen was open it was a matter of finding Conroy in the alphabetic list. Reading across from Conroy it indicated I needed Map 29.index-to-1898-map-sections

And wouldn’t you know it… here is the street that my great grandfather Peter Jordan was living on in the late 1890s and early 1900s. Not only that, but his father was living around the corner on St. Amable.

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Iris Catalogue number: 00030028680 Link: http//services.banq.qc.ca/sdx/cep/document.xps?id=0003028680

I am not done, my wonder-guide Sharon tells me that although I know where they lived in order to locate land records I will need to know what the Lot & Block number is. One thing always leads to another in genealogy.

At this point, I am surprised that my directionally challenged self made it this far!

The Harrop Family in Balcarres Saskatchewan.

William Lewis Harrop

I wanted to do a post in celebration of my great grandfather William Lewis Harrop’s birthday. William was the fifth and last child born to parents Lewis Harrop and Anna Eliza Stickle onSeptember 25, 1854, in Etobicoke, Ontario. The Harrop family had moved from New York sometime between 1843-1849, where their first three children were born.

In Etobicoke, the Harrop’s were farmers on land they rented. The father Lewis died in 1860 and was buried at St.-George’s-on-the-Hill Cemetery which is now located in the city of Toronto.

Anna Eliza along with her youngest children, William, Robert, Elizabeth and Mary relocated to Orangeville. Her oldest child Benjamin was married in 1856, moved to Chinguacousy, Peel Co., Ontario where he farmed.

In 1871, according to the Canadian census, my great grandfather William Lewis Harrop is living with the McKim family and working as a butcher’s apprentice. With land opening up in the west William makes a move to the Qu’ Appelle District of Assiniboine which later becomes the province of Saskatchewan.

About 1895 he took out an ad with a matrimonial agency and he struck up a correspondence with his future wife Isabella (Sherrill) Cornelius a widow from North Carolina. They were married about 1896 and Isabella moved with her daughter Flora Bell to rural Saskatchewan. The marriage was not long-lasting, William was widowed by 1904 and Isabelle’s daughter Flora went back to North Carolina, leaving her mother behind in the Indian Head Cemetery.

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The Harrop home in Balcarres, Saskatchewan. c1915

William may have used the same agency to find his second wife Rachel Hodgins who was from Huntley, Carleton Co., Ontario. They were married in Balcarres, Saskatchewan in 1907 and settled into life on William’s already well-established farm located on Sec 1 – 21-12-W2 in Balcarres. Three children were born to them over the next five years and the farm continued to prosper.

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Rachel Hodgins & William Harrop c1907

 

The start of the depression hit the farm hard ,coupled with the death of William in 1932, they Harrop family lost the farm that William had worked so hard to get established. Rachel his wife moved to Binscarth, Mantiboa where she died in 1950. Their children all moved to different locations, son Walter to Whitewood in Saskatchewan, Dorothy also to Binscarth and Wilma moved to Alberta.

 

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The Harrop family with unknown people. Back row ?, Walter & William Harrop. Front row Dorothy, ?, Wilma & Rachel c. 1920 probably taken at Balcarres, Saskatchewan.

 

 

 

Today is Grandma’s Birthday

I wanted to give a shout out to my grandmother who was born 115 years ago today, September 20, 1901 in Quebec City. My grandma Beatrice Jordan was the first born daughter of Peter and Caroline. Beatrice married John Dever in Montreal in 1928.

Beatrice had many interests, one of them was her family history. I am sure she is the family member who I inherited my genealogy passion from.

Happy birthday grandma! I wish You were still here so I could spend some time with you and ask you a few questions!😘

Me and grandma, 1972

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Genealogy Serendipity

Genealogy serendipity seems to be quite common, almost everyone has a story to tell. Although not the first time I have had this sensation and probably not the last, I had one of those moments today that could be described as coincidental or maybe something more.

Recently I have been getting assistance with my Quebec research from a kind and patient soul. This has me reviewing and reading through my research, exploring my records and assessing what I have and what I am missing. I also have been going through Quebec City Directories looking at addresses for my ancestors. Once I have located the addresses I have also been getting familiar with the maps of old Quebec, located also on the BAnQ website. This process is what I was working on when I realized that I had recently walked by a location of a relative’s restaurant.

Samuel Laprise married my three times great grandmother’s sister Elizabeth Jeffery at St. Andrew’s Presbyterian Church in Quebec City on March 17, 1853. Elizabeth was the widow  of George Robertson and already had a daughter Elizabeth.

Samuel was running the British American Hotel and later the London Coffee House on the Cul de Sac in old Quebec City. These were located in Directories Marcotte of Quebec and their predecessors, 1822-1976.

Discovering these locations I next went to Google Earth to see where it was and found them on the street below that I highlighted in orange.

 

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Cul de Sac found on Google Earth.

 

Once I saw this location on Google Earth I was instantly reminded of the trip I had recently taken to Quebec City in June and a very particular picture that I took.

 

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16 cul de sac was the location of the British American Hotel in 1864 and is now the Fudgerie a chocolate shop.

 

I had walked this street many times during my vacation and had been drawn to this location. I had photographed the street and added it as my Facebook cover picture. When you think about how many pictures I took during the trip of countless locations and monuments the fact that I selected this one to represent my trip on Facebook has some significance to me.

 

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Information the London Coffee House that was owned by George Pozer. This information was found on the website.

 

Samuel and his wife along with their three children left Quebec City in 1868, relocating to Chicago, Illinois. Samuel had his fill of restaurants, once in his new home he worked as a cooper. They did not return to Quebec City and they are buried together in Rosehill Cemetery in Chicago.

 

With help from my friend I hope to learn more about Samuel and Elizabeth’s business located on the Cul de Sac in Quebec City.

 

Working on Ships in 1800s

Jeremiah Norton was a carpenter on various ships throughout his career. Jeremiah was born in Great Yarmouth on the 29th of August in 1781, he stood a modest 5’4″ and set sail in 1805 at the age of 24 years. An anchor and a half moon tattoo was proudly displayed his on his left hand.

When he first went to sea he was already married, to Elizabeth Jillings, in Great Yarmouth at St. Nicholas Church (image of the Church in 1848). I was able to locate baptisms for five of his children, Mary Ann, Lee Thomas, Richard Lee, Martha and Edward from the years 1811-1825. During this time I assume he was often away on his sea voyages.

With help, I have located seven of the ships he sailed on; Agenoria, Medora, Elizabeth, Cygnet, Campbell, Lang and his final ship was the Norma in 1846. The majority of the destinations of these ships were Jamaica, but the Cygnet took Jeremiah to Quebec in 1838.

Jeremiah and his family eventually left Yarmouth and relocated to Shadwell, near London.  Jeremiah died at sea on the Norma when he was 65 years young and left a love of shipping to his sons. Edward went to sea when he was 14, Lee Thomas/Thomas Lee in 1831 and Richard worked on ships in Quebec where he resided.

 

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Photo found on Pixabay